Monday, July 7, 2008

Hard to Fit

I have been saddle shopping for some time. I tested quite a few Circle Y flex trees and they just didn't seem to work. I finally bought a Flex Curve and measured Maddy's back and sent the tracing to a saddle expert in Missouri. Apparently I have a hard to fit horse. She is very steep and narrow and I will be very limited in my saddle choices. I have been advised that a flex panel saddle is the only type of saddle that will work on her back. So I started looking and there is not a lot to choose from. There seems to be about four companies, Ortho Flex, Amera Flex, Timberline, and RL Watson. They are pretty spending, ranging from $1500 to $5000. The distributors for all companies are few and far between. Fortunately most have demo programs, which I will take advantage of before I buy. I am busy reading and looking and hopefully I will find my endurance saddle by the end of summer. I have a feeling this is going to be a lengthy process.

18 comments:

Grey Horse Matters said...

Saddle fitting is one of the hardest jobs, isn't it? We have the opposite problem with two of ours, no withers to speak of and broad backs. Everything we have tried either perches on their backs or spins when you put your foot in the stirrup. For the time being we have found a saddle that will fit both of them,it's not the ideal but as you said it's a lengthy process.

20 meter circle of life said...

Have you looked at the Wintec Pro Stocks?? They are awesome, if i needed a saddle just to trail in I would buy one in a heartbeat!!!

20 meter circle of life said...

Oh yes Grey Horse
Check out the thin line pads, problem solved I promise

Flying Lily said...

Saddle fit is one of the hidden costs of horse ownership -- at least hidden until you realize what a big $$$ it can be! I've had professional saddle fittings, then the horse's back changes with years or work, so a do-over. Gaaahh. At least with a flex tree you might be able to avoid that nightmare. Sometimes I'm amazed at old westerns where you see hundreds of happy cowboys and horses and I just wonder: How did they get all those saddles fitted??! Or did they just slap something on and ride out?

Molly said...

I've got an old saddle that fits my, um, seat, and I do go to extremes to make it comfortable for whoever I've slapped it on. It's got a high, tight fit.
Endurance saddles are another thing altogether. They have to fit properly. I hope your continued search will benefit both you and Maddy.

allhorsestuff said...

HI there sweetie...
I have 3 of the "Thin Line" pads.
All different configurations for you to see before you choose-should you go that way. And, I would maybe wait for the dream saddle-for as we talked, if you do some ground work to start her off developing her topline this summer/fall/or soon... She will change so much that the saddle fit will too. Get her develpoed some more-I'd advise. I could not believe the diff in Wa in a few months of rounded, contact lunging,
with the balance system.
Allhorsestuff(AKA-Kacy)

OregonElla said...

Love your blog! I've just taken up riding in my 40's and absolutely love it. Haven't done a trail ride yet (other than dude rides), but have purchased a trail horse and am taking lessons on her so that I'll be able to hit the trails soon. Would love to hear more about the trails you're riding since I'm near Salem.

Feel free to check out my blog(http://credospiritusequus.blogspot.com/).

Callie said...

Saddle fitting is hard and good luck with that one!

ranchette said...

I hear ya. I'm on the hunt for a new jumping saddle, as I'd posted about a while ago, but egads, my tastes are out running my budget rapidly. Good luck fitting Maddy's pretty broad back.

Rising Rainbow said...

Saddle fit is such a difficult thing and so much more important in endurance. I can't even imagine what those horses must go through that haven't been fitted properly.

Tracey said...

Jet, too, is narrow and high. I bought a built up, cut back pad to go under my Billy Cook. The saddle is actually pretty wide, so I'll be looking for something a bit narrower for her as well. Looking forward to seeing what you end up with and what works!

Jamie said...

Try a Tucker saddle. They are made for gaited horses who have thin backs and high withers. It might help.

Foster Communications said...

It's a good thing I'm not a horse person because I'd want to know...."Does it come in pink?"

Lori Schmidt (LoriProPhoto) said...

So glad you are getting some trail riding in, I am slowly getting closer to be able to be self sufficient and able to haul my own horse to the trails. I was meant to go with one of the horses we are selling tomorrow but they fitted the tow hitch to my vehicle but didnt do the wiring!!!! Don't want to risk being stopped by the police as it is an hours drive to the place I go to ride with friends.

I was interested to read about the boots as it was a way I was thinking of going rather than shoes because we can't find a reliable farrier here, but this has made me think twice, they are also expensive but then you expect to get more than two rides out of them.

The photos are great, they just show how much enjoyment you are getting out of your horse, what a great feeling.

Sandi said...

Hi,

I'm working with Takkle.com, a social networking site for sports. Members can post photos, videos, share stats and schedules, and a whole lot more with others throughout the community. Takkle is a place where students, athletes, coaches, and fans can share their passion for sports.

I feel that your site is very useful. I would love to know if you could link to our social networking resource.

Thanks,
Sandi

20 meter circle of life said...

Hey where did you go!!!!

photogchic said...

I lost my camera (well...set it on the roof of my car and drove off:-) and I just can't post without some pics....buying a camera this weekend...promise!

learninghorses said...

sounds so silly, but try a gaited horse saddle. They often have many of the same issues.